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Aboriginal peoples and the law Indian, Metis and Inuit rights in Canada by

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Published by Carleton University Press in Ottawa, Canada .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Canada,
  • Eskimos -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Canada

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies.

Statementedited by Bradford W. Morse.
SeriesThe Carleton Library series -- no. 131, Carleton library series -- no. 131.
ContributionsMorse, Bradford W. 1950-
The Physical Object
Paginationxlv, 800 p. :
Number of Pages800
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15196149M
ISBN 100886290198

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  As an introduction, [Aboriginal Peoples and the Law] offers ample contextualization of contemporary developments within the law—including overviews of historical background, treaties, Crown sovereignty, and Aboriginal rights and title—while keeping legal jargon and technical analysis to a its efforts to remain accessible to all readers, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law invites all. From the perspective of Aboriginal law, colonisation was a violation of the code of political and social conduct embodied in Raw Law. Its effects were damaging. It forced Aboriginal peoples to violate their own principles of natural responsibility to self, community, country and future existence. But this book is not simply a work of mourning. As an introduction, [Aboriginal Peoples and the Law] offers ample contextualization of contemporary developments within the law—including overviews of historical background, treaties, Crown sovereignty, and Aboriginal rights and title—while keeping legal jargon and technical analysis to a its efforts to remain accessible to all readers, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law invites all 5/5(1). Aboriginal Peoples and the Law responds to that call, introducing readers with or without a legal background to modern Aboriginal law and outlining significant cases and decisions in straightforward, non-technical language. Jim Reynolds provides the historical context needed to understand relations between Indigenous peoples and settlers and 5/5(1).

In Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction, Jim Reynolds offers an excellent new encapsulation of Canadian Aboriginal law, discussing cases stretching from up until the present day and covering topics including sovereignty, Aboriginal title and treaties. Reynolds draws on his wealth of experience to provide a compendious summary of the development of Aboriginal law in.   From the perspective of Aboriginal law, colonisation was a violation of the code of political and social conduct embodied in Raw Law. Its effects were damaging. It forced Aboriginal peoples to violate their own principles of natural responsibility to self, community, country and future existence. But this book is not simply a work of by: Jim Reynolds, a highly experienced Aboriginal rights lawyer, pursues two ambitious aims with his new book, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction. One is to provide a succinct yet comprehensive overview of Canadian law that focuses specifically on Aboriginal peoples. And the author hopes to do so in a way as to make Aboriginal [ ]. The RCMP’s enforcement of the Coastal GasLink injunction against the Wet’suwet’en has ignited a national debate about the law and the rights of Indigenous people. Aboriginal Law Report. By Bruce McIvor. This week's edition includes the ongoing RCMP raid, Trans Mountain, Treaty rights, Indigenous legal orders, nuclear waste, a class action.

This survey of law in relation to aboriginal peoples in Canada (Indian, Metis, Inuit) includes aboriginal title, pre-Confederation treaties, post-Confederation treaties, constitutional issues in native law, provincial laws, reserve lands, taxation and land claims in Quebec and the Northwest Territories and Yukon, as well as a table of cases, table of statutes and a chronology of key events. Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction. Jim Reynolds. UBC Press. Find this book: ‘Thoughtful and well-written (though brief!) analysis ’. This was part of the feedback I received in law school in on my Aboriginal Law paper about ‘Aboriginal title’, an Indigenous interest in land recognised by the common law.   As an introduction, [Aboriginal Peoples and the Law] offers ample contextualization of contemporary developments within the law—including overviews of historical background, treaties, Crown sovereignty, and Aboriginal rights and title—while keeping legal jargon and technical analysis to a its efforts to remain accessible to all readers, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law invites all 5/5(1). The term ‘law’ is a British concept that was first introduced to the Aboriginal peoples during the colonization period, whereby they were expected to abide by this new justice system. The term ‘lore’ refers to the customs and stories the Aboriginal peoples learned from the Dreamtime.